Executive Management

HRODC Postgraduate Training Institute
A Doha, Qatar (Qatar), Amsterdam, Netherlands (Paesi Bassi), Central London (Inghilterra) e 2 altre sedi

£ 4.000 - (4.701 )
+IVA

Informazione importanti

  • Corso
  • In 5 sedi
  • Durata:
    6 Months
  • Quando:
    Da definire
Descrizione

This Executive Management course is designed and aimed to those professionals who want to learn the best techniques and methods to fulfill the role of an executive manager.

You can choose to do this course in 3 or 6 months:
3 Months Intensive Full-Time (5 Days Per Week)
6 Months Full-Time (2-2.5 Days Per Week)

Informazione importanti
È la formazione giusta per me?

Senior managers. middle managers. junior managers. supervisors. team leaders. executives. board of directors. od practitioners. od professionals. lecturers. business owners. entrepreneurs. partners

Sedi

Dove e quando

Inizio Luogo
Da definire
Amsterdam, Netherlands
Damrak 1-5, 1012, Noord Holland, Paesi Bassi
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Central London
Carburton Street, W1W 5EE, London, Inghilterra
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Doha, Qatar
Al Wahda Street, 25500, Doha, Qatar
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Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Jalan Ampang Hilir, 68, Malaysia, Malesia
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Da definire
Paris, France
Rue de Valois, 75001, (75) Paris, Francia
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Cosa impari in questo corso?

Management
Organisational Change
Executive Presentation
Executive
Leadership
IT
Approach
Customer Service
Design
Communication Skills
Planning
Full Time
Organizational Skills
Team Dynamics
Team Leader
Team Training
Time management
Communication Training
Effective Communication
IT Development
IT Management
Directing
Client Management
Effective Resource Management'

Programma

The short content of the course:

- The functions of management
- The management process: its universality
- Planning: the basis for the emanation of subsequent functions
- The different types & levels of planning
- Planning as objective establishment
- Planning as a procedural issue
- Organising process, people & subsystems
- Fundamental issues in designing organisations
- Management implications for tall & flat structures
- An introduction to basic organisational forms:
- Simple structure
- Functional structure
- Divisional structure
- Matrix structure
- Organisational design as a function of organisational dynamics
- Important considerations in organisational design
- Designing for effective product/service management
- Designing for communication effectiveness
- Designing for effective client/customer focus
- Importance of vertical & horizontal relationships
- Directing or leading
- Directing or leading? : a question of leadership styles & administrative strategies
- Directing or leading? : Managerial control vs worker autonomy
- The relationship between leadership & worker motivation
- Co-ordinating
- mintzberg’s bases of co-ordination
- Mutual adjustment
- Direct supervision
- Output
- Standardisation of input
- Standardisation of work process
- Managing organisations in a stable environment
- Managing organisations in an unstable environment
- Increased leisure time
- Enhanced job satisfaction
- Reduced stress
- More opportunity to switch off after hours
- More room for forward planning & long-term solutions
- Higher creativity
- Time management tips for managers
- Reducing time spent on meetings
- Meeting management
- The trading game scenario
- What is delegation?
- Advantages of delegation to delegates
- What might be delegated?
- Benefits of delegation to delegates
- Prerequisites for effective delegation
- Support necessary during task performance
- Importance of communication in delegation
- Importance of power & authority in delegation
- Problems of ineffective delegation
- Groups: definition
- Distinguishing groups from aggregations
- Group solidarity
- Group cohesion;
- Team or group: a distinction
- Team dynamics
- Types of teams
- Command teams;
- Committees (temporary & Standing);
- Task Forces;
- Boards.
- Social identity theory
- Team building and maintenance roles: improving team effectiveness
- Encouraging members
- Harmonising
- Standard setting
- Gatekeeping
- Determining the optimum team size
- Providing team incentives
- Encouraging conflict
- Averting groupthink
- Avoiding the risky shift syndrome
- Employing transactional analysis
- Employing effective diversity management and discouraging resonation
- Rationale for and definition of training needs analysis
- Approaches, methods and techniques of training need analysis.
- The traditional approach to training needs analysis
- Job behaviour and task analysis
- Data is gathered from field observations using structured questionnaires and formal interviews
- Multi-skilling
- Knowledge skills, and attitudes development;
- Job, task and role analysis
- A strategic approach to competency assessment
- ‘Supply-led’ or ‘pedagogical’ approach to training needs analysis
- Demand-led’ approach to training needs analysis
- Behavioural expectation scales
- Focus groups
- Action learning
- Action research,
- Process management,
- Assessment centres
- Human resource plan
- Succession plan
- Human resource audit
- Critical incident reports
- Individual performance appraisal reports
- Personnel deployment charts
- Business plans
- Strategic plans
- Job evaluation or job tasks and role analysis
- Client or customer feedback
- What is organisational development (od)?
- Od and organisational effectiveness:
- Differing perspectives of organisational development
- Organisational climate;
- Organisational culture
- Organisational norms;
- Organisational values,
- Organisational power structure;
- Worker commitment;
- Structure of roles in organisation;
- Inter-group collaboration;
- The combination of the authority based in roles with the authority based in
- Influence change strategies:
- When they should be used or avoided.
- Control change strategies:
- When they should be used or avoided.
- Communicating organisational change. (Organisational change).
- Communication media:
- Mass or personalised communication?
- Mode and channels of communication.
- Getting the message right.
- Timing of communication.
- Who should communicate what, when?
- Use of groups in change process.
- Managing latent and manifest resistance to change.
- Effective, overall, change leadership.
- Leading change implementation.
- Selecting the appropriate change agent
- Internal or external.
- Speed of change.
- Change acceleration:
- Averting organisational (organisational) and individual casualties.
- Confidence.
- Change tolerance and individual stress levels.
- Managing the external environment:
- Improving perception and instilling
- Stakeholders, generally.
- Shareholders and funding agents.
- Customers and clients.
- Potential customers and clients.
- Change institutionalisation:
- Returning to normality. The objectives of the course:
- By the conclusion of the specific learning & development activities, delegates will be able to:
- Demonstrate their awareness of the inevitability of organisational change.
- Demonstrate their ability to conduct an internal environmental analysis-sw
- Exhibit their ability to conduct an external environmental analysis-ot
- Synthesize the relationship between internal and external environmental analyses-swot
- Demonstrate the need for a proactive stance in relation to organisational change.
- Determine the factors, which contribute to workers’ resistance to change.
- Suggest the efforts, which an organisation might employ to reduce workers’ resistance to change.
- Demonstrate their awareness of the inevitability of organisational change
- Demonstrate the need for a proactive stance to organisational change
- Take steps to create a positive perception of the organisation, among shareholders, funding agents, clients and customers, during a strategic change process.
- Manage the relationship between the organisation and its internal and external stakeholders during the different stages of the change process
- Determine the factors, which contribute to workers’ resistance to change
- Suggest the efforts, which an organisation might employ to reduce workers’ resistance to change
- Distinguish between change strategies and approaches to change
- Illustrate the advantages and disadvantages of each change strategy
- Employ the correct change strategy that will create ‘winners’ even in a ‘most hopeless’ situation.
- Determine the situations, in specific relation to scale, level, cost, urgency (both proactive and reactive), where a particular approach might be appropriate
- Determine the most effective ways of communicating change decisions to workers
- Illustrate the advantages and drawbacks of group involvement in decisions related to change
- Appreciate the importance of change institutionalisation
- Design measures, which will ensure change institutionalisation
- Assess the likely effect of power distance on the effectiveness of change communication, taking steps to create a favourable situation within the internal and external environments
- Distinguish between strategic and operational change
- Assess the impact of information and communications technologies (icts) on the change process
- Exploit the benefits of information and communications technologies (icts) in the planning, communication and implementation of change, being mindful of their drawbacks
- Match the mode, channel and method of communication with the nature and stage of the change process.
- Determine the type, level and stage of change that might be best suited to the ‘employment’ of internal or external change agents, respectively, maintaining an effective working environment
- Appreciate the difference between individual stress tolerance levels
- Devise methods of reducing stress levels
- Distinguish between the speed of change and ‘change acceleration’
- Determine when change acceleration is necessary
- Devise a strategy that will reduce the negative effects of ‘change acceleration’
- Implement change, whilst avoiding human and organisational casualties
- Demonstrate their awareness of change management and human resource implications.
- Distinguish between change strategies and approaches to change.
- Illustrate the advantages and disadvantages of each strategy.
- Manage latent and manifest resistance to change.
- Determine the situations when a particular approach might be appropriate.
- Determine the most effective ways of communicating change decisions to workers.
- Illustrate the advantages and drawbacks of group involvement in decisions related to change.
- Design measures, which will ensure change institutionalisation.
- Demonstrate leadership in the implementation of change, whilst avoiding whilst avoiding Human and Organisational Casualties.
- By the conclusion of the specific learning & development activities, delegates will be able to:
- Appreciate the value of time in an organisational context
- Regard time as an important resource
- Apply the principle of throughput accounting to organisational
- Activities as a motivation towards effective time-management
- Devise an effective time management strategy
- Manage meetings more effectively as a time management device
- Apply effective time management to competitive situations
- Distinguish between control and influence administrative strategies
- Demonstrate their understanding of the positive and negative implications of a manager’s choice of administrative strategy for the management of his or her organisation
- Demonstrate an understanding of the relationship, which exists between administrative strategy and leadership style
- Assess the leadership style of a superior or colleague
- Demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between a manager’s leadership style and the type of structure, which he or she is likely to implement
- Demonstrate their ability to carefully select administrative strategies so as to promote leader and organisational flexibility
- Propose ways of reducing cultural infringement in their choice of strategy

Ulteriori informazioni

Individual Block Cost:                         Ø  £4,000.00  Per Delegate for UK Delivery Ø  £5,000.00  Per Delegate for Delivery outside the UK