University of Liverpool

Internet Computing BSc (Hons)

University of Liverpool
A Liverpool (Inghilterra)

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Informazioni importanti

Tipologia Bachelor's degree
Luogo Liverpool (Inghilterra)
  • Bachelor's degree
  • Liverpool (Inghilterra)
Descrizione


Demand for graduates with internet-related skills continues to expand. This programme addresses the current skills shortage. You will be given the knowledge of internet principles that employers want, whilst at the same time studying a branch of computer science that is pushing the boundaries of technology. Introductory modules cover Programming in Java, Computer Systems, Databases, Human Centric Computing and Operating System Concepts. You will also take modules in Software Engineering, Database Development, Internet Principles, Advanced Web Technologies, and Mobile Computing amongst the others. The programme includes a related group project and an individual project. Department Key Facts UK league tablesRanked 1st in the UK for 4* or 3* research in the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014. Graduate prospects85% of our 2015 graduates are in a professional or managerial level job six months after graduating. National Student Survey90% of our students agree staff are good at explaining things (National Student Survey 2015) Research performance97% of our research is rated as world-leading or internationally excellent in the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014. Our leading research is in: • Complexity Theory and Algorithms • Agent Applications, Research and Technology • Logic and Computation • Economics and Computation Why this subject? Find the right degree for you. Whether or not you have prior computing experience, we offer degrees that are balanced between commercial, scientific and theoretical topics to help you grow professionally. Our courses provide the foundations of Computer Science and develop your knowledge, practical and employability skills through a range of topics...

Strutture (1)
Dove e quando
Inizio Luogo
15 set 2018
Liverpool
Chatham Street, L69 7ZH, Merseyside, Inghilterra
Visualizza mappa
Inizio 15 set 2018
Luogo
Liverpool
Chatham Street, L69 7ZH, Merseyside, Inghilterra
Visualizza mappa

Cosa impari in questo corso?

Credit
Computing
Java
Basic
Internet
IT
Basic IT training
Database
SQL
Database training
Operating Systems
Basic IT
Algorithms
Design
Construction
Logic
Web
Project
systems
Technology
Employability
Programming
Operating System
IT Development
Construction Training
Skills and Training
IT Development
Credit
IT
IT Development
IT

Programma

Module details Programme Year One

All single subject degree programmes offered by the Department of Computer Science share the same modules in Year 1.

You take the following modules:

  • Introduction to Programming in Java: Introduces you to concepts and principles of problem solving by computer, the construction of algorithms for the solution of problems and their implementation in the high-level programming language Java.
  • Introduction to Databases: Introduces you to concepts and techniques for the appropriate and efficient design of databases and database systems and provides you with an understanding and practical experience of data manipulation and query in SQL.
  • Computer Systems: Provides you with an overview of the components and operations of computers and their relationship to higher-level software systems.
  • Operating System Concepts: Introduces you to the structure and functionality of modern operating systems.
  • Human-centric Computing: Provides you with an introduction to designing, implementing, and evaluating interactive software systems.
  • Algorithmic Foundations: Introduces you to the terminology and techniques underpinning the study of algorithms and standard algorithmic design paradigms.
  • Foundations of Computer Science: Provides you with the mathematical foundation, mathematical tools and basic proof techniques necessary for the study of Computer Science.
  • Professional Skills in Computer Science: Provides you with an introduction to economic, ethical, historic, legal, organisational, research, and social aspects and perspectives on computing and develops key skills you require as a computing professional.
  • Logic in Computer Science: Introduces you to the notation and concepts of formal logic as necessary means of ensuring clarity, precision and absence of ambiguity in the specification and verification of computer-based systems.
Compulsory modules
  • Introduction To Programming In Java (COMP101) Level 1 Credit level 15 Semester First Semester Exam:Coursework weighting 0:100 Aims
    To introduce concepts and principles of problem solving by computer, and the construction of appropriate algorithms for the solution of problems.

  • ​To demonstrate the principles underlying the design of high level programming languages.

  • ​ To give students experience and confidence in the use of a high level programming language to implement algorithms.

  • Learning Outcomes

    ​ Be able to implement, compile, test and run Java programmes, comprising more than one class, to address a particular software problem.

    ​ Understand how to include arithmetic operators and constants in a Java program.

    ​ Be able to make use of members of classes found in the Java API (such as the Math class).

    ​ Demonstrate the ability to employ various types of selection constructs in a Java program.

    ​ Demonstrate the ability to employ repetition constructs in a Java program.

    Be able to employ a hierarchy of Java classes to provide a solution to a given set of requirements.

    ​ Demonstrate the ability to use simple data structures like arrays in a Java program.

    ​ Specific learning outcomes are listed above.


    General learning outcomes:

    • An understanding of the principles and practice of object oriented analysis and design in the construction of robust, maintainable programs which satisfy their requirements;
    • A competence to design, write, compile, test and execute straightforward programs using a high level language;
    • An appreciate of the principles of object oriented programming;
    • An awareness of the need for a professional approach to design and the importance of good documentation to the finished programs.

     

  • Introduction To Databases (COMP102) Level 1 Credit level 15 Semester Whole Session Exam:Coursework weighting 60:40 Aims
    1. To gain an understanding of database systems, encourage the appropriate and efficient design and usage of database systems at the conceptual and logical level;
    2. To provide an understanding and practical experience of of data manipulation and query in SQL;
    3. To provide a basic understanding of relational algebra and its mapping to SQL.
    Learning Outcomes

    At the end of this module the student should be able to

    1. identify principles of conceptual design using ER and UML design methodologies;
    2. apply principles of conceptual design using ER and UML design methodologies;
    3. recognise logical design principles, in particular normalization and functional dependencies;
    4. state the issues related to physical design;
    5. use SQL as a data definition and manipulation language, and as a language for querying databases;
    6. operate and use a basic DBMS;
    7. identify the principles underpinning the relational model and its relationship to SQL;
    8. identify the legal implications of creating and maintaining a database system.
  • Computer Systems (COMP103) Level 1 Credit level 15 Semester First Semester Exam:Coursework weighting 80:20 Aims
    •  To introduce how computers function at the instruction operation level.
    • To introduce the relationships between the instruction operation level and both the higher (software) and lower (hardware) levels
    Learning Outcomes

    At the conclusion of the module, students should: 

    • Understand how a computer operates at the machine code level;
    • Understand at an introductory level the structure of computer hardware at the gate and register transfer level;
    • Appreciate the roles and organisation of the major kinds of system software, including operating systems, compilers and system service routines.

     

     

     

  • Operating System Concepts (COMP104) Level 1 Credit level 15 Semester Second Semester Exam:Coursework weighting 80:20 Aims
    1. To introduce students to the structure and functionality of modern operating systems.
    2. ​To explain how the principal components of computer-based systems perform their functions and how they interact with each other.

    Learning Outcomes

    be able to state the overall structure and functionality of a modern operating system and the interactions between computer hardware and user-processes.

    ​be able to identify the operations of the major components of an operating system, including the device manager, file manager, memory manager, and process manager.

    be able to ​identify the functions of system programs, including parsers, compilers, and virtual machines.

    be able to ​construct programs which demonstrate in a simple form the operation of examples of systems program, including simple compilers and programs that involve the managment of concurrent processes.

  • Human-centric Computing (COMP106) Level 1 Credit level 15 Semester Second Semester Exam:Coursework weighting 80:20 Aims
  • ​To provide guidelines, concepts and models for designing and evaluating interactive systems.
  • To provid​ e an introduction to designing and implementing graphical user interfaces.
  • Learning Outcomes ​ identify or describe the tasks and issues, such as establishing requirements, developing designs, and implementing designs, which are involved in the process of developing efficient, effective, and safe interactive products for people, and the tools and techniques used to perform these tasks 
    identify or describe and compare different styles of interaction for graphical user interfaces​ evaluate and critique existing interactive systems, in accordance with human-centric principles, standards and guidelines for interface design, including usability, accessibility, and health and safety issues illustrate how event-driven software can be designed using standard, formal techniques​ construct Web pages that conform to current Web standards​

    write Java programs that demonstrate simple examples of graphical user interfaces

  • Algorithmic Foundations (COMP108) Level 1 Credit level 15 Semester Second Semester Exam:Coursework weighting 80:20 Aims
    1. To introduce the notation, terminology, and techniques underpinning the study of algorithms.
      1. ​ To introduce the standard algorithmic design paradigms employed in the development of efficient algorithmic solutions.

      2. To introduce the mathematical tools needed for the analysis of algorithms in terms of the use of formal models of Time and Space.
      3. Learning Outcomes describe standard algorithms such as sorting algorithms, search algorithms, string matching algorithms, graph traversal algorithms;

        apply these algorithms or a given pseudo code algorithm in order to solve a given problem;

        ​ carry out simple asymptotic analyses of algorithms involving sequence, selection, and iteration, and identify and compare simple properties of these algorithms;

        ​ describe the algorithm design principles of divide-and-conquer, greedy method, and dynamic programming and distinguish the differences between these principles;

        ​ apply the studied algorithms that illustrate these design principles;

        ​ apply the studied design principles to produce algorithmic solutions to a given problem;

        ​ explain and illustrate the distinction between different classes of problems, in particular, polynomial time and exponential time solvable problems.

      4. Foundations of Computer Science (COMP109) Level 1 Credit level 15 Semester First Semester Exam:Coursework weighting 80:20 Aims
        1. To introduce the notation, terminology, and techniques underpinning the discipline of Theoretical Computer Science.
        2. To provide the mathematical foundation necessary for understanding datatypes as they arise in Computer Science and for understanding computation.
        3. To introduce the basic proof techniques which are used for reasoning about data and computation.
        4. To introduce the basic mathematical tools needed for specifying requirements and programs
        Learning Outcomes Reason about simple data types using basic proof techniques;

        Iinterpret set theory notation, perform operations on sets, and reason about sets; ​

        Understand, manipulate and reason about unary relations, binary relations, and functions;

        Represe nt statements in propositional logic, and to recognise, understand, and reason about formulas in propositional logic;

        Apply  basic counting and enumeration methods as these arise in analysing permutations  and combinations;

        Perform simple calculation about discrete probablility.

      5. Professional Skills In Computer Science (COMP110) Level 1 Credit level 7.5 Semester Whole Session Exam:Coursework weighting 0:100 Aims
      6. ​To provide students with the key skills required of a computing professional.  

      7. ​T o develop the communication and employability skills of students.

      8. ​To provide students with an economic, historic, organisational, research, and social perspective on computing. ​

      9. To introduce students to concepts of professional ethics as well as social and legal aspects of computing. ​